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2000px-Typing_monkey.svgAs mentioned in my previous post, Peter Alvaro turned in his PhD thesis a month back, and is now in full swing as a professor at UC Santa Cruz. In the midst of that nifty academic accomplishment, he succeeded in taking the last chapter of his thesis from our BOOM project out of the ivory tower and into use at Netflix. Peter’s collaborators at Netflix recently blogged about the use of his ideas alongside their (very impressive) testing infrastructure, famously known as ChaosMonkey, a.k.a. the Netflix Simian Army.  This also generated some press, vaguely inappropriate headline and all.  Their work raised the flag on five potential failure scenarios in a single request interface.  That’s nice.  Even nicer is what would have happened without the ideas from Peter’s research:

Brute force exploration of this space would take 2^100 iterations (roughly 1 with 30 zeros following), whereas our approach was able to explore it in ~200 experiments.

It always feels good when your good ideas carve 28 zeroes of performance off the end of standard practice.

I encourage you to read the Netflix blog post, as well as Peter’s paper on the research prototype, Molly.  Or you can watch his RICON 2015 keynote on the subject.

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One Comment

  1. Peter wrote in to clarify that “the collaboration didn’t technically use the Simian Army, but the FIT fault injection infrastructure.” More about FIT here: http://techblog.netflix.com/2014/10/fit-failure-injection-testing.html


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