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Tag Archives: CALM

12/16/2010: final version of CALM/Bloom paper for CIDR now posted

Conventional Wisdom:
In large distributed systems, perfect data consistency is too expensive to guarantee in general. “Eventually consistent” approaches are often a better choice, since temporary inconsistencies work out in most cases. Consistency mechanisms (transactions, quorums, etc.) should be reserved for infrequent, small-scale, mission-critical tasks.

Most computer systems designers agree on this at some level (once you get past the NoSQL vs. ACID sloganeering). But like lots of well-intentioned design maxims, it’s not so easy to translate into practice — all kinds of unavoidable tactical questions pop up:

Questions:

  • Exactly where in my multifaceted system is eventual consistency “good enough”?
  • How do I know that my “mission-critical” software isn’t tainted by my “best effort” components?
  • How do I maintain my design maxim as software evolves? For example, how can the junior programmer in year n of a project reason about whether their piece of the code maintains the system’s overall consistency requirements?

If you think you have answers to those questions, I’d love to hear them. And then I’ll raise the stakes, because I have a better challenge for you: can you write down your answers in an algorithm?

Challenge:
Write a program checker that will either “bless” your code’s inconsistency as provably acceptable, or identify the locations of unacceptable consistency bugs.

The CALM Conjecture is my initial answer to that challenge.

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Bright and early next Monday morning I’m giving the keynote talk at PODS, the annual database theory conference.  The topic: (a) to summarize seven years of experience using logic to build distributed systems and network protocols (including P2, DSN, and recent BOOM work), and (b) to set out some ideas about the foundations of distributed and parallel programming that fell out from that experience.

I posted the paper underlying the talk, called The Declarative Imperative: Experiences and Conjectures in Distributed Logic. It’s written for database theoreticians, and in a spirit of academic fun it’s maybe a little over the top.  But I’m hopeful that the main ideas can clarify how we think about the practice of building distributed systems, and the languages we design for that purpose.  The talk will be streamed live and archived (along with keynotes from the SIGMOD and SOCC conferences later in the week.)

Below the break is a preview of the big ideas.  I’ll post about them at more length over the next few weeks, hopefully in more practical/approachable terms than I’m using for PODS.

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