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Tag Archives: BOOM

We were happy to find out this week that our BOOM project and and Bloom langauge have been selected by Technology Review magazine as one of the TR10, their “annual list of the emerging technologies that will have the biggest impact on our world.” This was news to us — we knew they were going to run an article, but weren’t aware of the TR10 distinction. Pretty neat.

I’ve been getting a lot of questions since the article launched about the project and language. So while folks are paying attention, here’s a quick FAQ to answer what the project is all about and its status.

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It’s official: the name of the programming language for the BOOM project is:  Lincoln Bloom.

I didn’t intend to post about Bloom until it was cooked, but two things happened this week that changed my plans.  The first was the completion of a tech report on Dedalus, our new logic language that forms the foundation of Bloom.  The second was more of a surprise: Technology Review decided to run an article on our work, and Bloom was the natural way to talk about it.

More soon on our initial Dedalus results.

lightning

For the last year or so, my team at Berkeley — in collaboration with Yahoo Research — has been undertaking an aggressive experiment in programming.  The challenge is to design a radically easier programming model for infrastructure and applications in the next computing platform: The Cloud.  We call this the Berkeley Orders Of Magnitude (BOOM) project: enabling programmers to develop OOM bigger systems in OOM less code.

To kick this off we built something we call BOOM Analytics [link updated to Eurosys10 final version]: a clone of Hadoop and HDFS built largely in Overlog, a declarative language we developed some years back for network protocols.  BOOM Analytics is just as fast and scalable as Hadoop, but radically simpler in its structure.  As a result we were able — with amazingly little effort — to turbocharge our incarnation of the elephant with features that would be enormous upgrades to Hadoop’s Java codebase.  Two of the fanciest are: Read More »

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